OODA - Decide

About OODA - Decide

In this step, the decision maker chooses the most appropriate course of action – which can also be taking no action at all. Is it desirable to intervene in the radicalisation process, and if so, when and how? How can it be done in a lawful and ethical way that respects human rights? In SAFIRE, work on this stage can be seen in the ethical and legal work and the work on the various types of intervention programmes and their effectiveness.

See below for relevant Focus documents within the step of DECIDE.

List of publications

What we gained: Practice and Science
H.J. Griffioen-Young and A.J. van Vliet, TNO
Taking a bird’s eye view of SAFIRE: The project’s main conclusions
Research ethics in radicalisation and intervention research
A. van Gorp, University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
How to research a sensitive topic using respondents
(Legal) constraints in terms of group targeting
A. van Gorp, University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
Differences between EC countries in allowing the selection of specific groups for social programmes
Credibility of intervention workers
J. Pliner, ISCA
How the relationship between intervention practitioners and participants can influence the process of de-radicalisation
What matters in counter and deradicalisation efforts
R. Wijn, TNO
Socio-psychological factors associated with effective counter- and de-radicalization interventions
Intellectual and motivational intervention approaches
J. Pliner, ISCA
The cognitive and societal components of the processes of radicalisation and de-radicalisation are described in the literature as intellectual and motivational elements
Decision of action
O. Cahuzac, CEIS
Going beyond ideology: an innovative way to analysing terrorism
The added value of network science in understanding radicalisation: how to look
A.J. van Vliet, TNO
This paper focuses on how network theory and technology can help improve the understanding of the processes of radicalisation so enhance description and understanding of principles of effective interventions. Ultimately, this can be used to prevent, halt or reverse processes of violent radicalisation in Europe
The added value of network science in understanding radicalisation: what we see
A.J. van Vliet, TNO
This paper focuses on what can be seen by applying network theory and technology to empirical evidence of cases of violent radicalisation in Europe
Cultural factors
Joaquim Pires Valentim, Ana Figueiredo, Joana Duarte, University of Coimbra and Dianne van Hemert, TNO
National cultural factors associated with processes of radicalisation leading to terrorism
Key socio-psychological factors in preventive and suppressive interventions
A. R. Feddes, L. Mann and B. Doosje, University of Amsterdam
In this document socio-psychological factors are described that need to be taken into account when intervening to prevent violent radicalisation or stimulate de-radicalisation
An interview study on effects of a Train-the-Trainer programme
B. M. Havermans, A. R. Feddes and B. Doosje, University of Amsterdam
In this document an evaluation is described of a programme that aims to prepare trainers for conducting a training that makes adolescents more resilient against violent radicalisation.
Does it work? How to evaluate effectiveness of a programme preventing radicalisation
A. R. Feddes, L. Mann and B. Doosje, University of Amsterdam
In this document we discuss criteria for effectiveness research and a procedure is described how to scientifically test the effectiveness of a programme that aims to prevent radicalisation
Democracy and deradicalisation programmes
A. van Gorp (University of Applied Sciences Utrecht) and A. Roosendaal (TNO)
Should a government be allowed to intervene in pre- or non-violent radicalisation?