Research

About Research

SAFIRE focussed on a suitable research paradigm and the use of empirical evidence on the process of radicalisation. What methodologies are best suited to radicalisation research? What ethical concerns are relevant for radicalisation research and how can you best deal with them? How do you assess the effectiveness of intervention programmes? These are some of the research-related questions investigated in SAFIRE. As a result of our work, we provide several research methodologies to better understand the process of radicalisation: for instance, network analysis, a quasi-experimental paradigm for field research, and methods for assessing interventions.

Below you will find links to Focus documents relevant for Research.

List of publications

What we gained: Practice and Science
H.J. Griffioen-Young and A.J. van Vliet, TNO
Taking a bird’s eye view of SAFIRE: The project’s main conclusions
Research ethics in radicalisation and intervention research
A. van Gorp, University of Applied Sciences Utrecht
How to research a sensitive topic using respondents
How to gain informed consent in radicalisation research
A. van Gorp, University of Applied Sciences Utrecht and A. Feddes , University of Amsterdam
How (de)radicalisation research can be done while meeting all the research ethics requirements without the risk of respondents being linked to the research project and being labelled a radical
What matters in counter and deradicalisation efforts
R. Wijn, TNO
Socio-psychological factors associated with effective counter- and de-radicalization interventions
Intellectual and motivational intervention approaches
J. Pliner, ISCA
The cognitive and societal components of the processes of radicalisation and de-radicalisation are described in the literature as intellectual and motivational elements
The added value of network science in understanding radicalisation: how to look
A.J. van Vliet, TNO
This paper focuses on how network theory and technology can help improve the understanding of the processes of radicalisation so enhance description and understanding of principles of effective interventions. Ultimately, this can be used to prevent, halt or reverse processes of violent radicalisation in Europe
The added value of network science in understanding radicalisation: what we see
A.J. van Vliet, TNO
This paper focuses on what can be seen by applying network theory and technology to empirical evidence of cases of violent radicalisation in Europe
Key socio-psychological factors in preventive and suppressive interventions
A. R. Feddes, L. Mann and B. Doosje, University of Amsterdam
In this document socio-psychological factors are described that need to be taken into account when intervening to prevent violent radicalisation or stimulate de-radicalisation
Does it work? How to evaluate effectiveness of a programme preventing radicalisation
A. R. Feddes, L. Mann and B. Doosje, University of Amsterdam
In this document we discuss criteria for effectiveness research and a procedure is described how to scientifically test the effectiveness of a programme that aims to prevent radicalisation
On self-deradicalisation
J.L. Marret, Fondation pour la recherche stratégique
Self-deradicalisation, as a self-driven process, does not seem to have ever been considered per se, though it is possible that many radicals remain unknown or undetected and, after a while, stop being radical on their own accord. Some theoretical corpuses deserve to be examined on this matter, as a very preliminary conceptual perspective.
Limitations to the terrorism literature
A. Reding, L. Clutterbuch, T. Hellgren, J. Gilbert and R. Warnes, RAND Europe
How limited primary and causal research undermines the literature on terrorism